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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

4 edition of Profiles and transitions of groups at risk of social exclusion found in the catalog.

Profiles and transitions of groups at risk of social exclusion

Costa Kapsalis

Profiles and transitions of groups at risk of social exclusion

lone parents : final report

by Costa Kapsalis

  • 191 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Applied Research Branch, Human Resources Development Canada in [Hull, Quebec] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Canada
    • Subjects:
    • Single mothers -- Canada -- Economic conditions.,
    • Single mothers -- Canada -- Economic conditions -- Statistics.,
    • Single fathers -- Canada -- Economic conditions.,
    • Welfare recipients -- Canada -- Statistics.,
    • Poor women -- Canada -- Statistics.,
    • Poor -- Canada -- Statistics.,
    • Public welfare -- Canada -- Statistics.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementCosta Kapsalis and Pierre Tourigny for Applied Research Branch, Strategic Policy, Human Resources Development Canada.
      GenreStatistics.
      SeriesWorking paper, Working papers (Canada. Human Resources Development Canada. Applied Research Branch)
      ContributionsTourigny, Pierre., Canada. Human Resources Development Canada. Applied Research Branch.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHQ759.45 .K37 2002
      The Physical Object
      Pagination68 p. :
      Number of Pages68
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3768420M
      ISBN 100662344391
      LC Control Number2003495928
      OCLC/WorldCa53861343

      risk of social exclusion, certain attributes or characteristics increase such risk. These are often linked to identity or group ascription. Kabeer () described. However, there are various understandings of social exclusion and integration. In the seminal article below, Hilary Silver highlights these, and illustrates how they stem from analysts’ own backgrounds and political traditions. Silver, H. (). Social Exclusion and Social Solidarity: Three Paradigms. International Labour Review, (

      Social exclusion is something that can happen to anyone. But certain groups, such as young people in care, those growing up in low income households or with family conflict, those who do not attend school, and people from some minority ethnic communities are disproportionately at risk of social Size: KB. In , % of children (aged 0–17) in the EU were at risk of poverty or social exclusion compared with % of adults (aged 18–64) and % of the elderly (aged 65 or over). Children were the age group with the highest at risk of poverty or social exclusion rates in .

      'Social Exclusion' is a key phrase in social policy and social politics across most of contemporary Europe. It is a description of the condition of individuals, households, neighbourhoods, ethnic and other 'identity' groups, who can be identified as being excluded from society.5/5(2).   In the past 20 years the United Kingdom has become a more unequal society in which many people have prospered while many others have not. 1,2 This issue includes several examples of the adverse health and social effects for groups that have been excluded from general prosperity (and some attempts to ameliorate these effects). But the consequences of social exclusion provide too Cited by:


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Profiles and transitions of groups at risk of social exclusion by Costa Kapsalis Download PDF EPUB FB2

Profiles and Transitions of Groups at Risk of Social Exclusion: Lone Parents Final Report Costa Kapsalis and Pierre Tourigny for Applied Research Branch Strategic Policy Human Resources Development Canada November SPE (également disponible en français).

The ultimate goal of this research is to assist Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) to identify policies that can help lone parents overcome barriers to employment, thus preventing or alleviating low income and social exclusion.

The analysis relies on the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).Cited by: 2. Get this from a library. Profiles and transitions of groups at risk of social exclusion: lone parents: final report. [Costa Kapsalis; Pierre Tourigny; Canada. Human Resources Development Canada. Applied Research Branch.] -- This study attempts to answer the following basic question: why do some lone parents escape low income or never enter spells of low income or social assistance (SA.

Profiles and Transitions of Groups at Risk of Social Exclusion: Lone Parents 23 As seen in Tableone surprising result was that the presence of pre-school age children did not have a negative.

Kapsalis, Constantine and Tourigny, Pierre (): Profiles and Transitions of Groups at Risk of Social Exclusion: Lone Parents. Published in: (November ). Kapsalis, Constantine & Tourigny, Pierre, "Profiles and Transitions of Groups at Risk of Social Exclusion: Lone Parents," MPRA PaperUniversity Library.

Profiles and Transitions of Groups at Risk of Social Exclusion: Lone Parents. By Constantine Kapsalis and Pierre Tourigny. Download PDF ( KB) Abstract. This study attempts to answer the following basic question: why do some lone parents escape low income or never enter spells of low income or social assistance (SA), while others remain in Author: Constantine Kapsalis and Pierre Tourigny.

Pupils at risk of exclusion are often regarded as uninterested in education and socially disruptive. The reasons behind the behaviour are less frequently considered. As such, Pupils at risk of exclusion have had little chance to express their stories. It tends to be after. Youth transitions are essentially to do with crucial changes in the human life course – the transition from one level of education to another, the transition from education to work, the Author: Dragana Avramov.

Using the latest annual data (), the graph below shows that certain groups continue to experience the highest rates of social exclusion: Women are more likely to be excluded than men. Some 44% people over 65 experience exclusion – more than any other age group.

Among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, 45% experience social. This report provides a detailed picture of the processes that shape ’poor transitions’. The authors argue that understanding social exclusion and devising effective policies to reduce it requires immersion in the experiences of the socially excluded.

Specifically, the report charts the longer-term transitions and outcomes of young adults who had grown up in a context of social exclusion as. the groups at risk of being excluded; what people are excluded from, e.g. employment, education, citizenship, respect; the problems associated with the impact of social exclusion, e.g.

low income, poor‘Social Exclusion and Social Solidarity: Three Paradigms’, International Labour Review, VolumeNumberspp.

How. Although family poverty is a common component of social exclusion risks, writers such as Sen (), Room () and Atkinson () are at pains to stress that the social exclusion concept embraces much more than this. As in the case of disability, social exclusion may not involve poverty at all.

In referring to 'five stepsFile Size: KB. similar social class locations, developed quite different youth transitions and outcomes. The second study, supported by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), aimed to test the value of underclass theories and the concept of social exclusion in explaining youth transitions (MacDonald and Marsh,a, b, ).

4 Understanding the risks of social exclusion across the life course. Youth and young adulthood. Executive summary few obvious trends in singular forms of risk over the period studied (/2 – /6), although severe disadvantage (experience of seven or more risks out of a total of 21) did fall from % to % over this period.

An initial stage of research on disadvantage and social exclusion was conducted in This included a literature review and consultation with Council staff and local groups and service provider organisations that work with at-risk populations. Each Boroondara suburb was profiled for characteristics related to disadvantage and social exclusion.

between the proportion of pupils in ethnic groups with either above average exclusion rates or below average exclusion rates in a school and the exclusion rates for such pupils. This tentatively indicates that exclusion rates for these groups of pupils at risk from exclusion are not influenced by the demographics of the schools they attend.

SchoolsFile Size: 1MB. The book provides a panoramic approach to social exclusion, with emphasis on structural causes (education, health, accidents) and on short term causes connected with the crisis which started in The picture emerging, based on econometric analysis, is that the crisis has widened the risk of.

In our study there is a core of young people whom, for now, we will call 'socially excluded' (see Table A). A brief review of some of the key features in their biographies to date demonstrates the complex and interrelated factors which can precipitate social and economic exclusion: unemployment, low pay, discrimination, lack of support, interrupted schooling, lack of formal qualifications.

Social Exclusion and the Transition from School to Work: The Case of Young People Not in Education, Employment, or Training (NEET) Author links open overlay panel John Bynner Samantha Parsons. Show more. It is concluded that effective counseling targeted at high risk groups, along the lines of the new UK “ConneXions” service, are needed Cited by:.

The Social Exclusion Knowledge Network This is the final report of the Social Exclusion Knowledge Network (SEKN) to the WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. It considers the meanings attached to the term ‘social exclusion’ around the world, presents a conceptual framework for understanding social exclusion in the context of.But social exclusion can happen to anyone.

As our society speeds forward to new technological and economic heights, it elevates some people – and leaves others behind. Individuals who belong to underprivileged groups or minority social groups are at higher risk of facing social exclusion.

Poverty is one of the key factors in exclusion.Downloadable (with restrictions)! This book provides a panoramic approach to social exclusion, with emphasis on structural causes (education, health, accidents) and on short term causes connected with the crisis which started in The picture emerging, based on econometric analysis, is that the crisis has widened the risk of social exclusion, from the structural groups, like disabled.